Educational Links

FOUNDING STATE CONSTITUTIONS
Biblical Requirements
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2016-Constitution Party of Minnesota All rights reserved
Minnesota Constitution, 1857

Mayflower Compact, 1620

Charter of Maryland 1632

Magna Carta, 1215

Articles of Confederation, 1781

Washington's Messages, 1789-1796

Declaration of Independence, 1776

The Federalist Papers, 1787-1788

Rufus King Notes Convention, 1787

Declaration to Take up Arms, 1775

National Constitution, 1787

Anti-Federalist Papers 1787

Constitution Convention Debates 1787
With this backdrop, the Constitution Party of Minnesota is providing the following links for personal edification, education, knowledge, power and wisdom
concerning the founding of our Republic. We further hope you seriously study to know truth and share said learning with others.

Our founders were very clear on the high expectation of wise, educated, virtuous population needed to preserve freedom. Join us in learning, our future
offspring are dependant on us preserving original intent, living by and governing under those principles.
Historical Education Links
There was a distinction between the national government limited powers and sovereign states rights. The truth exists in the founding documents; the citizens of the American colonies were, unlike the
national government, free to require spiritual, Christian elected officials who exhibited wisdom and good behavior. An additionally notable requirement was a universal loyalty of elected officials to their
respective sovereign states and not to a national government; a conceptual testament to fiercely independent States mutually joined and served by a national common bond.

Of the 13 colonies who signed the Declaration of Independence eight states, South Carolina; March 19, 1778, Pennsylvania; September 28, 1776, North Carolina; December 17, 1776, New York; April
20, 1777, New Jersey; July 2, 1776, Maryland; November 11, 1776, Georgia; February 5, 1777 and Delaware; September 10, 1776 adopted State Constitutions while five Connecticut, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, Virginia, and Rhode Island modified existing colonial charters while rejecting English tyranny.

During and after the Declaration of Independence ratification the new states acknowledged God’s providence in some form while establishing the Republic States; and like it or not many newly formed
States held professions of Christian faith as an oath for any State level elected leadership position.

Here we provide the text within the new Constitutions related to requirements for holding public office. The information is for those who support high standards of public leadership, Christian character
and for those
who ignorantly support separation of Church and State which is non-existent in the original documents.

Delaware; September 10, 1776
ARTICLE. 22. Every person who shall be chosen a member of either house, or appointed to any office or place of trust, before taking his seat, or entering upon the execution of his office, shall take the following oath, or affirmation, if
conscientiously scrupulous of taking an oath, to wit:

" I, A B. will bear true allegiance to the Delaware State, submit to its constitution and laws, and do no act wittingly whereby the freedom thereof may be prejudiced."

And also make and subscribe the following declaration, to wit:

" I, A B. do profess faith in God the Father, and in Jesus Christ His only Son, and in the Holy Ghost, one God, blessed for evermore; and I do acknowledge the holy scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by divine
inspiration."

And all officers shall also take an oath of office.

Georgia; February 5, 1777
ARTICLE. XV. Any five of the representatives elected, as before directed, being met, shall have power to administer the following oath to each other… qualify them to take their seats, viz: " I, A B. do solemnly swear that I will bear true
allegiance to the State of Georgia, and will truly perform the trusts reposed in me; and that I will execute the same to the best of my knowledge, for the benefit of this State, and the support of the constitution thereof, and that I have
obtained my election without fraud or bribe whatever; so help me God."

Maryland; November 11, 1776
Article LV. That every person, appointed to any office of profit or trust, shall, before he enters on the execution thereof, take the following oath; to wit :-" I, A. B., do swear, that I do not hold myself bound in allegiance to the King of Great
Britain, and that I will be faithful, and bear true allegiance to the State of Maryland; " and shall also subscribe a declaration of his belief in the Christian religion.

New Jersey; July 2, 1776
Article XXIII. That every person, who shall be elected as aforesaid to be a member of the Legislative Council, or House of Assembly, shall, previous to his taking his seat in Council or Assembly, take the following oath or affirmation,
viz: " I, A. B., do solemnly declare… I will not assent to any law, vote or proceeding, which shall appear to me injurious to the public welfare of said Colony, nor that shall annul or repeal that part of the third section in the Charter of this
Colony, which establishes, that the elections of members of the Legislative Council and Assembly shall be annual; nor that part of the twenty-second section in said Charter, respecting the trial by jury, nor that shall annul, repeal, or
alter any part or parts of the eighteenth or nineteenth sections of the same…"

New York; April 20, 1777
Article VIII. That every elector, before he is admitted to vote, shall, if required by the returning-officer or either of the inspectors, take an oath, or, if of the people called Quakers, an affirmation, of allegiance to the State.

North Carolina; December 17, 1776
Article XXXII. That no person, who shall deny the being of God or the truth of the Protestant religion, or the divine authority either of the Old or New Testaments, or who shall hold religious principles incompatible with the freedom and
safety of the State, shall be capable of holding any office or place of trust or profit in the civil department within this State.

Pennsylvania; September 28, 1776
SECTION 10. A quorum of the house of representatives shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of members elected; and having met and chosen their speaker, shall each of them before they proceed to business take and
subscribe, as well the oath or affirmation of fidelity and allegiance hereinafter directed, as the following oath or affirmation, viz: I do swear (or affirm) that as a member of this assembly, I will not propose or assent to any bill, vote, or
resolution, which stall appear to free injurious to the people; nor do or consent to any act or thing whatever, that shall have a tendency to lessen or abridge their rights and privileges, as declared in the constitution of this state; but will
in all things conduct myself as a faithful honest representative and guardian of the people, according to the best of only judgment and abilities.

And each member, before he takes his seat, shall make and subscribe the following declaration, viz: I do believe in one God, the creator and governor of the universe, the rewarder of the good and the punisher of the wicked. And I
do acknowledge the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by Divine inspiration.

And no further or other religious test shall ever hereafter be required of any civil officer or magistrate in this State.

South Carolina; March 19, 1778
SECTION XIII “…No person shall be eligible to sit in the house of representatives unless he be of the Protestant religion, and hath been a resident in this State for three years previous to his election…”

Vermont; July 8, 1777
SECTION IX. A quorum of the house of representatives shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of members elected; and having met and chosen their speaker, shall, each of them, before they proceed to business, take and
subscribe, as well the oath of fidelity and allegiance herein after directed, as the following oath or affirmation, viz. " I ____ do solemnly swear, by the ever living God, (or, I do solemnly affirm in the presence of Almighty God) that as a
member of this assembly, I will not propose or assent to any bill, vote, or resolution, which shall appear to me injurious to the people; nor do or consent to any act or thing whatever, that shall have a tendency to lessen or abridge their
rights and privileges, as declared in the Constitution of this State; but will, in all things' conduct myself as a faithful, honest representative and guardian of the people, according to the best of my judgment and abilities."

And each member, before he takes his seat, shall make and subscribe the following declaration, viz. " I ____ do believe in one God, the Creator and Governor of the Diverse, the rewarder of the good and punisher of the wicked. And
I do acknowledge the scriptures of the old and new testament to be given by divine inspiration, and own and profess the protestant religion."

And no further or other religious test shall ever, hereafter, be required of any civil officer or magistrate in this State.
A primary goal for the Constitution Party of Minnesota is
education the population about all original intent aspects of civil
government.

From the temporary subordinate powers of said governments,
local to national (as defined through the chains of the national
Constitution, Bill of rights, other founding documents and state
constitutions) in relationship with the consent of the governed as
a body and supremacy of individual sovereignty as created by our
Founding Fathers; to the God granted obligations,
responsibilities, and virtue required individually for the
preservation of the Republic. A group of individual sovereign
states voluntary unified for mutual benefit, a national government
protecting all aspects of individual, corporate, state, civil, and
religious sovereign autonomy.